KymaConnect, vM2, vKA FAQ’s

*** vM2 and vKA are no longer offered for sale. ***

No. KymaConnect is installed on Macs only.
KymaConnect 2 is for users of macOS 10.14.6 through macOS 11. KymaConnect 1 is used if running operating systems older than macOS 10.14. KymnaConnect 2 supports Apple Silicon Macs.

See all the differences between them here on the KymaConnect product page
KymaConnect 2 is a free upgrade for existing license holders. You can use your current license key to enable KymaConnect 2. The latest version of KymaConnect 2 can be downloaded here.

If you have misplaced your license key, you will need to buy a replacement license Contact us for details.
No, KymaConnect 1 is not compatible with macOS 10.15 or macOS 11. It is designed to work on Intel Macs running OSX 10.6.8 (Snow Leopard) through macOS 10.14.6 (Mojave). KymaConnect 1 is discontinued and is no longer updated, or maintained.

KymaConnect 2 supports macOS 10.14 (Mojave), macOS 10.15 (Catalina), and macOS 11 (Big Sur), and includes "universal binary" native support for both Intel and Apple Silicon Macs.

KymaConnect 1 is no longer available. However, the KymaConnect 2 installer download also includes an installer for the final version of KymaConnect 1. This is provided as a convenience for users running Macs that are not able to update to at least macOS 10.14 (Mojave). A KymaConnect 2 license key can be used with KymaConnect 1.
Note: KymaConnect 2 does not include CapyLink.

The discontinued KymaConnect 1 was in many ways "CapyLink Deluxe". CapyLink focuses on a very specific capability: providing enough OSC support so that Capybara users can take advantage of Delora Software's vKi and vKiP wireless controllers. It made no attempt to streamline a Capybara's MIDI set up. KymaConnect 1 on the other hand, steps beyond the basic CapyLink features to fully integrate up to four MIDI devices. This feature alone often removes the need to have some type of hardware MIDI patchbay and merger between the Mac, external MIDI devices, and the Capybara. It is also a feature that is useful every time you use Kyma, even when you are not using wireless control. Furthermore we have enhanced CapyLink's OSC facilities by adding some commands to control basic Kyma operation, like starting and stopping a sound, choosing a VCS page, or a VCS preset. These can be used by controllers like TouchOSC.
See the KymaConnect 2 user manual or "Advice/How to" section on our Support page for some tips.
KymaConnect 1 has been discontinued and is no longer updated or maintained. It was replaced by KymaConnect 2. KymaConnect 1 required OS X 10.6.8 through macOS 10.14.6 so it could not be used on more recent macOS versions.

KymaConnect 1 license holders can upgrade to KymaConnect 2. See more information on the KymaConnect product page.

The KymaConnect 2 installer download also includes an installer for the final version of KymaConnect 1. This is provided as a convenience for users running Macs that are not able to update to at least macOS 10.14 (Mojave). A KymaConnect 2 license key can be used with KymaConnect 1.
KymaConnect enhances your Paca(rana) set up by providing enhanced MIDI support and by increasing your set up networking options. The basic Paca or Pacarana based Kyma set up requires a MIDI interface for the Paca(rana). This can be accomplished with one of three approaches: connect a compatible USB MIDI interface to the Paca(rana), use a FireWire soundcard with a built-in MIDI interface with the Paca(rana), or use an application like KymaConnect that uses the Paca(rana)'s OSC support to deliver MIDI to and from the Paca(rana).

But KymaConnect goes beyond this basic MIDI facility. It's quite common to want to control your Kyma sounds from an external MIDI controller and from a software DAW or other application. This requires at least a MIDI interface on the computer dedicated to the Paca(rana). If you desire to play Kyma sounds without the software DAW running then you will also need some type of MIDI merge or MIDI switch facility. KymaConnect includes a MIDI patchbay and MIDI merge features. This saves additional MIDI hardware, plus the dedicated MIDI interface from the computer to the Paca(rana)'s MIDI port is no longer necessary. When you add up the cables and MIDI devices KymaConnect eliminates, it's quite a savings in cost and system complexity.

KymaConnect also simplifies placing the Paca(rana) on a network, a requirement if you wish to use any type of OSC control from either software applications or other devices like Kyma Control running on an iPad. If your Mac currently does not use any networking, or only uses its built-in Wi-Fi then you are faced with adding a network hardware like switches/hubs, even Wi-Fi access points just so you can take advantage of something like Kyma Control. This may not be an issue in the studio but on stage it can add a good deal of extra cables and gear, which of course means a greater likelihood of a mishap.

KymaConnect greatly simplifies most Paca(rana) networking setups by making it possible to directly connect the Mac and Paca(rana) using the Mac's built-in Ethernet connection. A second Mac network connection, usually its built-in Airport Wi-Fi, is then used to either connect to a larger, more comprehensive studio network, or to simply provide a dedicated Wi-Fi network that you can connect your iPad or iPhone/iPod in order to use controllers like vKiP, vKi, Kyma Control, or TouchOSC. Again KymaConnect saves you both cost and complexity.

Even if you are already fully networked in your studio, and the Paca(rana) can be conveniently connected by a physical network cable, you may still find KymaConnect a useful addition. One "trick" is that you can dedicate a direct network between the Mac and the Paca(rana). This isolates the Paca(rana) OSC traffic from general network traffic, which improves latency and increases reliability. Furthermore since you can also create a "private" Wi-Fi network between that same Mac and an external device, that too can have greater reliability and less latency. KymaConnect is a key ingredient to a robust, high performance network between your Wi-Fi controller and the Paca(rana).

Some final words about MIDI and the Paca(rana). OSC opens new horizons on the Kyma landscape but it does not yet replace MIDI. MIDI remains an important, essential ingredient in your Kyma workflow. It is the normal way you play and sequence your sounds from an external sequencer, whether that runs on your Mac or is even a dedicated hardware sequencer. It is also the means by which you play Kyma sounds from keyboard and other controllers. If you still wish to use physical controllers like the MotorMix, BCF2000, or even a general purpose MIDI "fader box" those still rely on MIDI passing to and from the Paca(rana). So nearly every Kyma set up today still faces the need to have a MIDI connection to and from the Paca(rana). KymaConnect provides this and a good deal more.
Most OSC and similar controllers do not currently support BlueTooth. KymaConnect supports the standard OS X networking scheme that also supports Bonjour and UDP (Wi-Fi and Ethernet the most common) but other "network stacks", such as BlueTooth, should work in theory.

However real-world limitations make BlueTooth impractical at this time. iOS controllers like our vKiP and vKi do not support BlueTooth due to current iOS restrictions, and the limitations of the technology. BlueTooth is very useful for low data bandwidth applications like keyboards and mice, and it has special modes to support some media streaming. But as a general network "transport layer" it does not offer low enough latency and sufficient bandwidth to create a high quality OSC controller experience. BlueTooth also suffers from limited connection range. So it is not something we recommend or support at this time.
While OSCulator may seem to offer some of KymaConnect's features, there are important differences. Many users will find that using OSCulator and KymaConnect together is the smoothest way to integrate external control into a Kyma set up.

One of the benefits of KymaConnect is that it is designed to replace hardware MIDI interfaces, merge boxes, and cables. Both KymaConnect and OSCulator each offer a virtual MIDI port that applications can use to send MIDI to and from a Paca(rana). KymaConnect adds support for four additional devices. KymaConnect also adds a powerful MIDI router that can address some difficult MIDI connection issues. OSCulator, on the other hand, requires an additional application to handle input from those MIDI devices to merge their MIDI data before sending it on to the Paca(rana).

With KymaConnect "just sit down and play" can be important. It silently runs in the background so that your MIDI controller is always at the ready to play a Kyma sound; no other software (other than Kyma itself!) is needed. With OSCulator you need to start it, and a second application. In a sense KymaConnect is the missing ingredient to afford your Kyma system the same ease-of-use as a conventional hardware synthesizer.

KymaConnect also addresses the networking side of things in a way that works seamlessly with any application or device that expects to use bidirectional OSC communication with the Paca(rana).

OSCulator is a powerful, flexible tool that can provide many benefits to a Kyma set up. It can be used along side KymaConnect for comprehensive Kyma control. KymaConnect handles general MIDI control in an easy manner; OSCulator handles special controllers and requirements in a powerful manner. Together they form an awesome team!
Typically the firewall is operating in your network router connected to the Internet. This does not require any additional set up. A firewall will only enter the picture if you are using vM2 or vKA in "Paca(rana) mode", meaning you are using a network connection to send OSC to and from the Paca(rana).

Whether the firewall is an issue or not depends on where the firewall is installed. In general a firewall can affect set up if it is between the computer running vM2/vKA and the Paca(rana). The reason is that the Paca(rana) both receives and sends OSC messages. In order to send to the computer running vM2/vKA the firewall must be set up to allow those messages through. A common situation where the firewall can become a factor is when the firewall itself runs on the same Mac as vM2/vKA.

Each of these products uses a dynamic port assignment method to create the necessary communication pathway between the Paca(rana) and the Mac. This can make firewall set up a little tricky. Basically the firewall must pass UDP messages to any of the ports in the range of 49,152 - 65,535.

If your Mac is running OSX's built-in firewall then you still have to set it up to allow vM2/vKA and your Paca(rana) to communicate. Leopard's and Snow Leopard's firewall will automatically ask permission to allow vM2/vKA to send and receive messages. vM2/vKA attempts to reuse the same port each time you start it so answering the firewalls prompt to allow communications is usually a one time affair. However if the port is currently in use by another application then vM2/vKA will use a different port and you will be asked by the firewall to allow that port.

If you use another type of firewall and are unable or unwilling to open up the required ports then you will no longer be able to benefit from dynamic port assignment. vM2 and vKA do not support assigning a specific port number from the preference pane but there is a work around. Please contact support (support@delora.com) and we will be happy to provide instructions.
Typically the firewall is operating in your network router connected to the Internet. This does not require any additional set up.

If the firewall is between your Mac running KymaConnect and your iDevice then you will have to set it up to allow network traffic between the Mac and your iDevice. We discourage this usage as it greatly complicates set up. For more information about a firewall between your Mac and iDevice, see the corresponding question in the vKiP FAQ’s.

If the firewall is between your Mac and the Paca(rana) this also requires firewall set up. Again we discourage this type of configuration and recommend that your Mac, Paca(rana), and iDevice all connect behind the same firewall.

If your Mac is running OSX's built-in firewall then you still have to set it up to allow KymaConnect to communicate with your iDevice, and for KymaConnect to communicate with your Paca(rana). The built-in firewall should prompt you the first time you run PacaConnect to ask for permission to use the appropriate ports. However, KymaConnect normally uses dynamically assigned ports, meaning that the ports used can change each time you run it. KymaConnect attempts to reuse the same ports it used previously but if some other application is using them KymaConnect will use different ports, and the firewall will again ask you for permission to use those ports. The port numbers are in the range 49,152 - 65,535, and the network traffic type is "UDP".

If you use another type of firewall and are unable or unwilling to open up the required ports then you will no longer be able to benefit from dynamic port assignment. You can use the "Force port 8000" option on the preference panel to partially address this but the port used to connect to the Paca(rana) does not have such a preference setting. However there is a work around. Please contact support (support@delora.com) and we will be happy to provide instructions.
Sure! vKA is designed to work with Kyma and Ableton Live at the same time. You can switch between which application the APC-40 is currently controlling with a simple button press. When the APC-40 is controlling one application vKA still monitors activity from the other and remembers it so when you switch back everything is as expected. Please see the vKA user manual for more details.
PacaConnect has been discontinued for a number of years. PacaConnect only worked on OS X 10.5.